Thursday, April 24, 2014

Hoopoe nestlings, nestling by Janet Gough


Hoopla, Hoopdance and Hoopligan, three Hoopoe chicks:
detail of a larger coloured pencil drawing
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My hoopoe chicks hatched last week and are peeking out of the tree hole on my drawing pad. My dearest friend Janet gave me a big laugh offering three perfect names for my feathery babies. She has written the following text on Hoopla, Hoopdance and Hoopligan:
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They say that birds of a feather flock together, but these young hoopoes are very much an international brood. Here are their noms de plume:
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Hoopla’s name comes from a British game, which involves throwing hoops onto a surface where there are prizes to be won if the hoop encircles the prize. So Hoopla is a dexterous and sport-loving hoopoe. When he wins, he wHoops with joy. However, when he doesn’t, he tends to create a bit of a hoopla (an unnecessary fuss). He sometimes flaps his wings and gets his feathers in a flap. But mostly he is a sporting, sporty hoopoe.
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Hoopdance is named after a Native American dance, as well as a fictional Ojibwe town in some of Louise Erdrich’s wonderful novels. She is already an eggsellent dancer, and when she grows up, she wants to dance the hoop dance, and the jingle dance. She will not have to worry about her costume – hoopoes have beautiful plumage – or about having a bad hair day. Hoopoes don’t have hair don’ts, as they have magnificent natural headdresses.
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Hoopligan was a bit of a tearaway from the moment he came out of his shell. His name comes possibly from Irish, but we are not sure of the exact origins. Will he become a fully-fledged hooligan? Who knows? Perhaps when he spreads his wings in a flight of fancy, he will hatch a plot to become something entirely different.
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They also say that you shouldn’t put all your eggs in one basket. But hoopoes know better. These are three young hoopoes in one tree hole, and they are feathered friends who know the importance of not being eggocentric. When they leave the nest, they will not have to jump through hoops to become happy hoopoes.
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Janet Gough
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Janet is a freelance lexicographer, editor, and translator, at janet.gough2@ntlworld.com

Paula Kuitenbrouwer at www.mindfuldrawing.com, based in the Netherlands. She has seen Hoopoes in Italy.
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1 comment:

  1. Oh, this made my morning! Love your sketch and your friend's fanciful naming.

    ReplyDelete

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